WP 1.1 - The prevalence of anaphylaxis in children and adults in the Emergency Room

Background:

Most anaphylactic reactions in children and adults are elicited by foods, followed by drugs and stinging insects. In up till one quarter of the reactions no culprit is subsequently identified. Underlying diseases such as mastocytosis, unstable asthma or angioedema may constitute at least a part of the unidentified cases. Data on the incidence and prevalence of anaphylactic reactions in our part of the world are sparse, but incidence seems to be increasing, especially in children.

Data from other parts of the world report an annual incidence of Emergency Room (ER) visits as shown in the following table:

 

Country

Year

Annual incidence of the severest reactions

Switzerland

2004

7.9?9.6/100.000

US

2011

6.6?8.7/100.000

US

2008

49.8/100.000

UK

2008

6.7/100.000

 

Hypothesis:

Anaphylactic reactions (including those requiring treatment with adrenaline) are under?diagnosed in Denmark. Other diseases mimicking anaphylaxis are often not identified. The relative high incidence of idiopathic anaphylaxis reported in the literature can be reduced dramatically by use of a standardized investigational program in the ER and subsequently at the Allergy Centre.

 

Methods:

One year prospective survey in the Emergency Room and Acute Pediatric Ward at OUH with subsequent follow up investigations at the Allergy Centre. Development and application of standardized programs in ER and for subsequent diagnosis including differential diagnoses (e.g. angioedema, mastocytosis). 

Webdesign af mira.dk